Lammas & Lugh, The Craftsman God

Lammas, also commonly called Lughnasadh, is a harvest holiday. It's usually on August 1st or 2nd.

On this day, we honor our ancestors and the hard work they had to do in order to survive. This is a good time to give thanks for the abundance we have in our lives, and to be grateful for the food on our tables. Lammas is a wonderful time of transformation, of rebirth, and new beginnings.

The word Lammas derives from the Old English phrase hlaf-maesse, which translates to loaf mass. Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NAS-ah) is still celebrated in many parts of the world today. Lugh's influence also appears in the names of several towns throughout Europe.

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Lugh was known as a god of both skill and talent. Legends say that Lugh was a master craftsman, poet, healer, and jack-of-all-trades. Worshiped as the sun god, he symbolizes enlightenment as he brings light to the world. For many Pagans and Wiccans, Lugh is invoked when for assistance with creativity. He is honored at the time of harvest, not only as a god of grain but also as a god of late summer storms.

Lugh was born from the relationship of Ethne, the daughter of the Fomorian king Balor and a young man, Cian (Kian) who belonged to Tuatha Dé Danann and in our earlier article on Ancient Pages, we described how Lugh came into the world. Tailtiu was Lugh’s foster-mother and his adoptive father was the god of the sea, Manannán mac Lir, who was older than the Tuatha de Danaan tribe people but considered as one of them. 

In Ireland many people celebrate Lughnasadh with dancing, song, and bonfires. The Catholic church also has set this date aside for a ritual blessing of farmers' fields. 

In early Ireland, it was a bad idea to harvest any time before Lammas(or Lughnasadh). However, on August 1, the first sheaves of grain were cut by the farmer, and by nightfall his wife had made the first loaves of bread of the season.

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God Lugh

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A. Sutherland. "Lugh – Mighty God Of Light, Sun And Crafts In Celtic Beliefs." ancientpages.com/2018/04/30/lugh-mighty-god-of-light-sun-and-crafts-in-celtic-beliefs/

Wigington, Patti. "Lugh, Master of Skills." thoughtco.com/lugh-master-of-skills-2561970.